2010 IBM Global CEO Study & How To Ignite Creative Leadership In Your Organization

I’m sharing an article from HBR blogs that summarizes and adds to the 2010 IBM Global CEO Study, a wonderful and insightful piece of work to energize today’s corporations. Go thru the article, and download IBM study here.

IBM just released its 2010 Global CEO Study based on face-to-face interviews conducted with over 1,500 CEOs spanning 60 countries and 33 industries.

Here are some key points from the study:

Even if the recession is over, 79% CEOs expect the business environment to become even more complex in coming years.
More than half of CEOs doubt their ability to manage this escalating complexity.
Western CEOs anticipate economic power to rapidly shift to developing markets, and foresee heavier regulation ahead.
A majority of CEOs cite creativity as the most important leadership quality required to cope with growing complexity.
Creativity in this context is about creative leadership — i.e., the ability to shed long-held beliefs and come up with original and at times radical concepts and execution. And this requires bold, breakthrough thinking. We believe, however, that this isn’t about having a lone creative leader at the top but rather about creating a “field” of creative leadership, by igniting the collective creativity of the organization from the bottom up. In essence, creative leaders excel at creating creative leaders.

The report identifies a group of standout organizations which delivered solid business results even during the recent downturn. Their revenue growth was six times higher than the rest of the sample and they plan to get 20% of revenues from new sources in the near future.

Creative Entrepreneurship in a Downturn

Whatever the headlines predict these days, there may still be good news for entrepreneurs. Many successful products, services, and pivotal ideas have been launched during an economic lull, according to Bhaskar Chakravorti, a senior lecturer of business administration at Harvard Business School, citing the examples of Motorola, Southwest Airlines, Revlon cosmetics, Hewlett-Packard, and MTV.

Good ideas are not hard to come by. The more complicated part is to harness the diminishing supply of capital. But capital can still find its way to a credible idea, he argues.