Project management offices grow more essential during recession

Tracking the progress and activity of your projects provides useful data that can be used to assess the efficiency of IT operations and improve your PMO. Nayan Patel, corporate manager of portfolio management at Baylor Health Care System, uses this information for the following purposes:

• Identify projects that need attention: See which projects have slowed down or haven’t had much work put into them. Are they still a priority? If not, reallocate resources and attention to more pressing needs.

• Cross-analyze IT departments: How are they doing? How much effort are they putting in? What are their costs like? Determine who’s doing what and to what extent to improve management quality.

• Assess the data overall: By watching trends in resources, workload, activity and cost, you can provide valuable information for future management decisions. — KC

More on PM and the Times We Live In

The key point that I draw from both these articles, as well as from our own recent research on PMOs and Resource Management, is that the PMO is a powerful nexus of people and processes; companies that use this organizational structure wisely can invest wisely, cut costs wisely, preserve valuable resources wisely … and avoid the worst dislocations of recession.

2009: Thoughts from – and for – the C-Level

Turning around failing projects … faltering organizations … struggling industries … a challenged economy … for CEOs and CPOs, it’s a great opportunity to put the logic of project management into play. Where old-school management and processes have failed us, it’s time to put some new thinking in place. That should be every leader’s game plan for 2009.